Mom accused of concealing daughter’s diabetes makes first court appearance

EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. - A mother accused of hiding her daughter's diabetes made her first appearance in court Friday.

Amber Hampshire's daughter, Emily, died last fall. The Madison County State's Attorney's Office claims Amber concealed the illness for years.

Prosecutors said the suspect's friends and family—even her husband—didn't know. They charged Amber Hampshire with manslaughter and said she kept her daughter's diabetes a secret since a 2013 diagnosis.

Hampshire's attorney said she had no comment. She came to court with her husband.

When asked if the diagnosis had truly been hidden from him, Hampshire's husband responded, "No, I don't have anything to say. Thanks."

Defense Attorney John Stobbs asked for a continuance in Friday's hearing but said his client would be pleading not guilty.

"She's presumed innocent. They're good people. She and her husband are good people," Stobbs said. "At the end of the day, for me, it's just a tragedy this little girl is gone."

Emily Hampshire died November 1, 2018 from diabetic ketoacidosis. Court records indicate a hospital social worker discovered Emily was diagnosed long ago and almost died in February 2018. Search warrants reveal Amber Hampshire received all of the medical supplies she would need to treat her daughter at that hospital visit.

"Instead of trying the case in the press, I think that--and I appreciate the prosecutor is not doing that--is just let the evidence come in as it comes in because there's gonna be medical records," Stobbs said. "I assume they've done an autopsy, so we'll be able to determine what happened from the records."

Stobbs said he believes they'll be back in court at the end of the month and that a grand jury may weigh in on this before then.

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