Warming Centers for the Metro St. Louis Area
Closings: Schools, churches, day-cares and businesses

New laws go into effect in Illinois and Missouri

Happy New Year and with a new year means people waking up to new laws in Missouri and Illinois.

Those new laws taking effect Tuesday, January 1, 2019, and there will be more to come later this month.

More than 50 new laws go into effect in Missouri this new year including a pay increase for thousands.

Beginning today, the minimum wage in the Show-Me State is now $8.60 an hour.

It will then increase every year by 85 cents until reaching twelve dollars in 2023.

A new constitutional amendment changing Missouri’s legislative redistricting process goes into effect. Governor Mike Parson says it should be repealed. Parson opposes the "Clean Missouri" initiative approved by voters in November.

He cites concerns about a requirement for a state demographer to draw house and senate maps to achieve fairness. Clean Missouri organizers say they will fight any effort to change or repeal it.

Illinois rings in the New Year with 253 new laws on the books. Here are a few of the high-profile ones.

A state law that takes effect New Year’s Day requires children to ride in rear-facing car seats until they’re 2-years-old, weigh 40 pounds or are 40 inches tall, making recommendations from child-safety advocates into Illinois law.

Also, a red flag gun law which allows courts to remove guns from threatening individuals.

The law is called the "firearms restraining order act”. Family members or police can ask a judge to temporarily remove guns from anyone who they think is a threat to themselves or others.

Hunting laws in Illinois just got a little more colorful. Hunters can now wear bright pink hunting vests in order to meet safety requirements during deer season. Previously hunters were limited to bright orange. Lawmakers say the new color option will help hunters see each other and prevent accidents.

Also, an amendment to an existing law that will make it illegal for employers to discriminate against African-Americans by paying them lower wages.

Several laws will fight opioid abuse. Prescribers will have to complete three hours of continuing education on opioid use and insurance companies may not require prior notification of certain substance abuse treatment.

Schools will have to conduct at least one police-approved active shooter safety drill each year.

If your boss requires you to use your personal phone or computer for work, there must be a reimbursement policy. Additionally, nursing mothers may be excused from jury duty.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.