Safety concerns following Texas high school shooting

ST. LOUIS - “Still have several more shots firing. He’s active shooting. He’s in the art room. We’ve got – we’ve got shots fired now guys. We need you all up here.”

That’s what officers said over the radios as they searched for Sante Fe, Texas school shooter. 8:32 a.m. – that’s when sheriff’s deputies from Harris County, Texas were on a manhunt to find an active shooter that opened fire at Sante Fe High School.

“I was scared for my life,” a student said. “Nobody should go through this. Nobody should feel like this in school.”

Students say shots could be heard shortly after hearing a fire alarm. In that unknowing moment, students rushed into the spray of gunfire.

“A teacher was telling us, 'go, go, go,'” a student said. “And then it’s like instinct you’re scared, you’re running as fast as you can. That’s when I said, 'Oh my gosh, something traumatic just happened.'”

Officers eventually arrested Dimitrios Pagourtzis, but by that time 9 students and 1 teacher had already been killed and almost a dozen more injured.

The fire alarm method the 17-year-old allegedly used comes in question as it’s the same heinous technique used in the Parkland shooting.

Joe Delia, a Whelan Security Consultant, recommends an additional precaution being made before students rush out of the classroom.

“We have to develop a better protocol for these fire alarms," Delia said. “When you have a student within the school, you have an insider threat. He understands the process of what’s going to happen when he pulls that fire alarm.”

As school districts and politicians try to find ways to fix this lingering problem, students across the country are left wondering when solutions will be made.

“Nobody should have to go through this, nobody should have to feel that pain,” a Texas student said.