The secret lesbian affair that could affect a murder victim’s $150,000

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(KPLR) - FOX 2 News continues digging into the mystery and conflicting accounts surrounding the murder of Betsy Faria.

Betsy’s friend, Pam Hupp, has many changing stories, all caught on video or audio. A civil court judge is in the process of deciding whether Hupp can keep the proceeds of Betsy’s $150,000 life insurance policy. It was signed over to Hupp’s name four days before the murder.

Pam Hupp has told so many different stories about where she was the night of Betsy’s murder and her relationship with the victim that the civil attorneys for Betsy’s daughters, Leah and Mariah, asked again.

Attorney Chris Roberts asked Hupp, “Did you have a sexual relationship with Betsy?”

“Sexual on what basis?” Hupp said. “What’s sexual to you?”

“Did you ever tell law enforcement officials that you were having a sexual relationship with Betsy?” Roberts said.

“I did,” Hupp said.

The civil case against Hupp is about questioning her credibility, which is something criminal investigators did not do. This summer, when prosecutor Leah Askey retried the case against Russ Faria, Hupp dropped a bombshell. During the pre-trial interview on June 17, 2015, Hupp told police, “(Betsy) had a mad crush on me.”

Hupp continued. “She really, really, really loved me; loved me at that time. And it just kept growing from that.”

Hupp claimed Betsy pressured her. She said Betsy, “started indicating that she wanted more from me than just, you know, a friend. And I was, ‘It's just not going to happen.’”

“I loved Betsy. I'm not in love with her, never was in love with her,” Hupp said. “She was in love with me… She was in love and at that point, when I knew what was happening with her and my friend (dying from cancer) I just let that go because it was a small, small thing to give her.”

Hupp told the investigator she caved to Betsy’s desires.

“We were drinking wine and stuff like that,” Hupp said. “She'd start crying or whatever. You try to console and whatever. It wasn't that many times. It's just something I sacrificed for her because it's no big deal to me.”

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Detective Mike Merkel told her, “Well, that's the problem-solver in you. You knew that would help her.”

Hupp continued, “Oh, and it did.”

“So you gave her…,” Merkel began to say.

Hupp interrupted, “She needed that.”

“You gave her that,” Merkel said.

An attorney for Betsy’s daughters said that story contradicts Hupp's testimony she gave under oath a few months earlier for the civil case. He played the tape.

The interview was from July 2014, when civil attorney David Butsch said to Hupp, “You said Betsy loved you.”

Hupp: “Yes.”

Butsch: “Do you have anything in writing that indicates that?”

Hupp: “In writing?”

Butsch: “Yes.”

Hupp: “No, we were not having an affair or anything like that; you would send cards and stuff. I mean, we would send cards to each other that would say, ‘Love, Betsy,’ birthday cards, things like that, but it wasn’t intimate. There was not an intimate relationship if that’s, I’m not sure that`s what you’re asking.”

Butsch’s co-counsel Chris Roberts then shut off the tape and turned to Hupp on the stand.

“That was your testimony at the deposition is that right?” he said.

“Ok,” Hupp said.

“Is that right?”

“Yeah,” Hupp said with a shrug.

In this civil trial, Hupp argues that Betsy wanted her to have the $150,000. It's a tough decision for the judge, because he's looking at a signed beneficiary form that doesn't have any further instructions.

Also, it should be noted that there is no evidence of a lesbian love affair other than Pam Hupp’s word.
Betsy’s family doesn’t believe it. Her husband Russ doesn’t believe it, either. And Betsy’s closest friends, who said they even shared stories about sex, said they don’t believe it.

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