New twist in the saga of where the confederate monument will be moved to

ST. LOUIS – A new twist in the battle over the future of the confederate monument.

The Executive Director of the Missouri Civil War Museum, Mark Trout, said the museum is now the new owner of the monument and has the papers to prove it.

According to Trout the original ordinance said that the Daughters of The Confederacy were the owners of the monument and Tuesday they handed the deed to the monument to the museum.

“We are 100 percent now as of this morning the rightful owners of that monument and we would love to work with the city as soon as possible to remove that and put it in safe keeping,” said Trout.

Trout said the ordinance passed by the city in 1912 stated that the United Daughters of The Confederacy could erect a monument in Forest Park but they would be responsible for maintenance.

“So, that right there tells you it was not the city’s property, if it was the city’s property or the city thought it was theirs or the daughters gave it to them it would have been the city’s responsibility to take care of it but that`s not how it has been for 103 years,” said Trout.

Tuesday the President of the Missouri Division of the United Daughters of Confederacy sent Trout a deed gifting over the ownership of the statue to the museum.

In response to this Mayor Lyda Kewson`s office put out a statement saying in part, “That that the process to remove the monument began more than a year ago, and in that time, they have not been aware of an organization that has come forward with a credible clam of ownership to the monument.”

Trout said the United Daughters of The Confederacy didn`t come forward sooner because they didn`t have the people to look into it and hoped it would blow over.

“The vandalism started and political figures started getting involved they saw us in it and realized that even though it is their property the best place for it is in a civil war museum or civil war historic site,” said Trout.

He said the museum has offered to take the monument and pay for that process.

The mayor has previously said they want a say in how it is displayed in the future, to ensure it will that will never celebrate the confederacy.

Trout said he can guarantees it won't be displayed until an appropriate historical setting is found and that it will never be re-erected in the city of St. Louis.

Trout said he has reached out to the city and has not herd back.  If he still doesn`t hear anything they will draft a document to send over to city hall.