Absentee voting begins in Dem primary do-over for Missouri 78th District

ST. LOUIS (KPLR) - Absentee voting starts Thursday in the new Democratic primary election ordered for Missouri’s 78th District House of Representatives Seat.

The results of the original election were thrown out by a judge.

The election pits Democratic incumbent Penny Hubbard against political newcomer Bruce Franks. Hubbard won the primary, but Franks sued after questions arose about how absentee ballots.

Last Friday, Judge Rex Burlison threw out the election results, ruling mistakes and irregularities caused by election board staff put the election results in doubt.

The main issue: how the absentee balloting process was handled.

On Wednesday, election officials met to work out details on how the new election will be put together. The meeting came a day after Governor Nixon appointed two new election commissioners including a new chairman.

As this all unfolds, Missouri’s Secretary of State is urging St Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce to check every absentee ballot from the original August primary to make sure they are legitimate. Joyce is already investigating the August election for any potential violations.

The actual election day in this 'do-over' is September 16. The results will have to be certified quickly because absentee balloting for the November election starts September 27.

And there is still an appeal pending to the judge’s decision to throw out the original election results. That appeal, filed by Hubbard’s attorneys, is set to be heard next week.

For additional information about voting absentee or in the special election, go to www.stlelections.com.

If you want to vote in the November 8, 2016 general and presidential election, you must register to vote in Missouri by October 12, 2016.

For information about voter registration in Illinois, go to www.elections.il.gov. The deadline for most Illinois voter registration locations is October 11, 2016. However, Illinois allows registration and early voting in limited locations under its ‘grace period’ rules.