Nearly 120 protests planned across the natiion over Ferguson decision planned

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Ferguson Farmer's Market Protest

A day after protests over the grand jury decision in Michael Brown’s death rocked Ferguson, Missouri, people across the country made plans to voice their anger again Tuesday.

As of midday, nearly 120 protests were planned for Tuesday in 35 U.S. states and Washington, D.C., as well as Canada and London, according to information from a site set up to help organize the efforts.

In North America, the planned demonstrations ranged from Bangor, Maine, in the East to Portland, Oregon, in the West; from Edmonton, Alberta, in the North to Miami in the South.

In Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, protesters lay down on a sidewalk outside police headquarters as if dead, according to a Tweet by Nikki Burdine, a reporter for CNN affiliate WUSA.

Some had handwritten notes on their chests: “Black lives matter.”

The protest was similar to one Monday night outside the White House.

In Chicago, a few dozen protesters gathered Tuesday morning on a downtown street corner ahead of another protest scheduled near City Hall, CNN affiliate WGN reported.

The protests follow peaceful ones Monday night in which several hundred people marched from police headquarters to downtown. They stopped traffic at times, but no property damage was reported and no arrests were made, the station said.

“I think what happened yesterday is a great injustice to everyone that’s been fighting for equality in this country,” one Chicago protester told WGN on Tuesday. “And I think that just because a bad decision was made doesn’t mean people who believe in equality are going to fall silent.”

Protests sprang up around the nation Monday night, after the announcement of the grand jury’s decision not to charge Ferguson police Officer Darren Wilson in Brown’s August 9 death.

In New York, a roving crowd accompanied by police wound its way through the city, surging to more than 1,000 in Times Square before heading toward the Upper West Side, CNN’s Miguel Marquez tweeted.

Police arrested a 21-year-old Brooklyn man after he allegedly threw red liquid resembling blood on police Commissioner William Bratton as the official walked through Times Square, CNN affiliate WABC reported.

Earlier in the evening, about 200 people flocked to Union Square, brandishing signs that read, “Jail killer cops” and a large display, in lights: “Black lives matter.”

Protesters knocked down barricades and headed toward the West Village before turning north, accompanied by police.

Emotions boiled over in Philadelphia, too.

“Shouts of ‘f— the police’ at word of no indictment,” a Philadelphia Inquirer reporter tweeted. “A man with the mic: ‘we don’t need to get mad.’ Others: ‘yes we do!’ ”

Two people were taken into custody, according to CNN affiliate WPVI. The protesters were arrested when a crowd tried to march onto Interstate 95, the station said.

In Oakland, California, shop owners posted signs in their windows, “We support Michael Brown,” as marchers took to the streets.

A crowd filled the intersection at 14th and Broadway, and some demonstrators lay down in chalk outlines, reports on social media showed. Later, they merged onto Interstate 580, shutting down traffic.

Some protesters stood on top of an unmarked police car and spray-painted it, according to CNN affiliate KTVU.

In Seattle, anger turned to violence as protesters threw bottles, rocks and cans of food and fired a powerful firework toward police, according to CNN affiliate KIRO.

Five people were arrested, the station said, citing police.

“Same story every time, being black is not a crime,” protesters shouted, KIRO reported.

In Los Angeles, a city still scarred by the riots of 1992, silent protesters staged a similar demonstration at the intersection of La Brea and Wilshire.

A group also assembled in front of the Colorado Capitol in Denver calling for nonviolence, according to CNN affiliate KMGH.

The Chicago Tribune reported that about 200 protesters gathered outside the city’s police headquarters, chanting “We are Mike Brown!” and “I am Mike Brown!” They also carried signs, the paper reported, bearing phrases like “Won’t stop ’til we get justice,” “Killer pigs must pay” and “Stop the racist killer cops.”

Later, they marched through downtown before stopping at the State of Illinois Center, where they chanted into bullhorns. Chicago police scrambled to keep up.

Protests around the country appeared to be largely peaceful, compared with the scenes unfolding in Ferguson. There, demonstrators set police vehicles ablaze and officers fired canisters into the crowds.

CNN’s Miguel Marquez and Bill Kirkos contributed to this report.

By Michael Pearson, Jessica Ravitz and John Blake