Mother of 5 captures man on video exposing himself at laundromat

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(KTVI) - They lost their loved one to heroin in January of 2013. Nicky Vigna was 20. Her family started a very visible effort to stop anyone else from losing a life.

They walk twice a week in their St. Peters neighborhood with fluorescent colored shirts stamped with the words, 'STOP HEROIN.'

The walk came to Lindenwood University Thursday. One of Nicky`s childhood friends extended the invitation.

'It was just weighing on my heart with a lot of people I know who are losing friends and family,' said Casey Christensen.

Nicky`s sister spoke to the group about her sister`s overdose.

'People think the person using heroin is just like a junkie under the bridge, they`re just somebody that you would never ever see,' said Brittney Vigna. 'In reality, it`s people that you know. '

The walks have been a source of inspiration for former addict Kyle Baxter to stay clean.

'It`s something that I have hope for every single week,' Baxter said.

He said heroin is available just about anywhere.

'If you want to use, you`re going to find it,' said Baxter.

Danielle Rancilio agrees. She lost her brother Tony to heroin.

'It`s in everyone`s neighborhood and it`s just so dangerous,' said Rancilio.

The mother of Nicky Vigna wants parents to know just how cheap and accessible heroin is.

'The average cost of heroin is $5 a button,' said Gee Vigna. 'That`s what they can buy heroin with, and one button of heroin can kill them.'

Experts say heroin can also kill the ability of users to say know. They say a user can get hooked after just one use.

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