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Bees Bouncing Back In Missouri

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ST. LOUIS, MO (KPLR) - Two bee or not two bee....well, actually, it`s more like 30,000 bees in this backyard.

'They're on the bounce back,' says beekeeper Fred Pipkins.  'A few years ago they were almost gone and Ive seen a good comeback on them.'

Fred and Sally Pipkins happen to have a couple of hives outside their home.

'They`re a little better this year because there more active this year eyes of the warmer weather,' says Pipkins who wears honey colored eye glasses.  'They`re laying faster and more.'

All across Missouri this usual spring is causing a buzz in the air. For the Pipkins, there`s about 2000 new honeybees hatching everyday in their Edmundson backyard.

'How many times have you got stung?' asks Patrick Clark.
'I can`t even tell you how many times I've gotten stung,' laughs Pipkins.

The insects, who were in danger of being endangered are getting help from hobbyists like the Pipkins.

'Colony collapse disorder,' explains Pipkins.  'Only, I believe it's nothing but insecticides.'

Thanks to the work of people like the Pipkins and other hobbyists, the honeybees might be making a Missouri comeback.

'We knew nothing when we started,' laughs Sally Pipkins.  'We didn't know there were bee clubs.'

'If you hear them coming like a loud buzzing noise that's a drome,' says Fred.  'A drome cannot sting you.  It's only purpose in life is to meet with the queen.'

Believe it or not, the couple gets their queens from California...by mail.

'When they get to the post office they'll call you at 6 o'clock in the morning and say, `Come get the bees,' exclaims Sally.

They say, beauty is in the eye of the bee holder.
And these bee holders are helping the honeybee make a return.
You could say it`s their Missouri mission, or their, 'Plan B.'


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